Browsing Tag

american history

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The Colorful, Historic ‘Lost Shul Mural’ of Burlington, Vermont

By On July 20, 2017

Travel guide trivia: What Northeastern American city was once known as Little Jerusalem? If you guessed other than Bernie’s green stomping grounds of Burlington, Vermont, try again. In the Green Mountain State,… Read More

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In Rhode Island, Jews Can Marry Their Relatives!

By On July 12, 2017

Here’s a legal love story for you. In 1913, Sam May and Fannie May, a coupla 26-year-old New Yorkers, wanted to get married, but they had to go all the way to… Read More

How Passover Inspired The Jewish Stop on the Underground Railroad
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How Passover Inspired The Jewish Stop on the Underground Railroad

By On April 19, 2016

“Once we were slaves in Egypt. Now we are free people.” These words from the Haggadah rang in the ears of Jews who fought to end slavery in the United States. One… Read More

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The Premier Ladies’ Magazine for the 19th-Century American Jewess

By On February 29, 2016

  Imagine scathing remarks about how “grotesque” ladies’ hats can look in profile, pseudo-macrobiotics (don’t shun “the much-abused cucumber,” and striking preoccupation with bicycles—spiced with Jewishness, shellfish recommendations, and women’s empowerment—sharing the pages… Read More

Go Down, Moses
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How “Go Down, Moses” Took the Underground Railroad to the Seder Table

By On February 18, 2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liqIkoIOUwQ Q: What do Passover, Paul Robeson, and one particular episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air all have in common? A: This song: The earliest recording of “Go Down Moses” was… Read More

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The Lithuanian Jew Whose Initials Grace Lincoln’s Arm

By On February 3, 2016

If you look very carefully at a penny, you’ll notice something you’ve probably never seen before: initials pressed into the dark underline of Lincoln’s bicep. Those initials stand for Victor David Brenner—the… Read More

Micanopy, Florida: The Moroccan Jewish Utopia That Might Have Been
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Micanopy, Florida: The Moroccan Jewish Utopia That Might Have Been

By On January 21, 2016

19th century America was a bit of a free-for-all, so when the wealthy Moroccan Sephardic businessman Moses E. Levy saw an opportunity for land, he took it. Levy, who was born in… Read More

The Year Jesus Came to Thanksgiving. Sorry, Jews, etc.
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The Year Jesus Came to Thanksgiving. (Sorry, Jews, et al.)

By On November 27, 2015

Though the first Thanksgiving took place in Plymouth, Massachusetts, 1621, it wasn’t until 1863 that President Lincoln codified the holiday as an American tradition. It was only a few short years more… Read More

He Insulted John and Yoko, and Started a Feminist Tradition
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He Insulted John & Yoko and Started a (Sorta) Feminist Tradition

By On June 15, 2015

On November 15, 1937, a cartoon strip gave birth to an American holiday. Named Sadie Hawkins Day after “the homeliest gal in all them hills,” the fictional holiday created by famously acerbic… Read More

The Jews Behind American Whiskey
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The Jews Behind American Whiskey

By On June 1, 2015

CNN Money recently reported, “American whiskey is taking over the world.” Some bottles go for over $5000. (In comparison, a bottle of Manischewitz Concord Grape averages $6.99.) Which is why Reid Mitenbuler’s… Read More

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Take a (Virtual) Trip to 19th-Century Jewish New Hampshire

By On March 19, 2015

  Many history lessons about the wave of Jewish immigrants between the 1890s and early 20th century revolve around urban neighborhoods like New York’s Lower East Side. But a digital exhibition arm of… Read More