People of the Glass?

July 11, 2013
By
whiskey

People of the Book, sure. But people of the glass? If whiskey lovers have their way, maybe. Jewish whiskey lovers have known for a while that they’ve got it good. Most whiskey is naturally kosher, unlike wine, which has more stringent criteria for obtaining a hechsher. Even so, many popular scotch-makers, like Glenmorangie and Bowmore, are going…

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“Goodbye, Boys!” & Forbidden Soviet Jewish Film

July 10, 2013
By
goodbye-boys

In the lazy summer days of the late 1930s, 3 Soviet teenagers roam the streets of a small seaside town as their youth slips away and WWII looms. The boys, one of whom is Jewish, look forward to their military careers, getting away from overprotective parents, and becoming heroes. Thus begins Goodbye,…

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The Rabbinic Sage Who Dismembered His Adversaries

July 9, 2013
By
hadrian

Talmudic and aggadic lore offers many episodes of rabbinic sages intellectually defeating the luminaries of the Hellenistic world. Far less common are instances of rabbis dismembering their pagan nemeses. So 2nd-century Rabbi Joshua Ben Hananiah really stands apart. As recounted in the Babylonian Talmud (Bekhorot 8b-9a), acting on Roman Emperor Hadrian‘s dare to abduct Athens’ top philosophers,…

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A Modern Hebrew / Arabic Bard

July 8, 2013
By
almog-behar

When he begins writing poetry, Hezkel, one of the protagonists of Almog Behar’s novel Rachel and Ezekiel (2011), says to himself: “Perhaps if I add lines that I heard during prayers, and religious verse that I remember, and spice them up with some of my own words, I will be able to…

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Illustrating the Talmud, Daily

July 5, 2013
By
draw-yomi-1

An artist and an observant Jew, Jacqueline Nicholls truly fulfills the biblical commandment to write your own Torah. She’s an avid student of Judaism, and her reactions frequently take the form of art projects. She’s invented a series of kittels that explores the ways clothing is used as a vehicle for meaning and identity, and…

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God Bless America—or, Mose and His Big Jewish Nose

July 4, 2013
By
mose-band

Today is the 4th of July, so it’s time to join a rousing chorus of that great patriotic American anthem, “When Mose with His Nose Leads the Band.” What, you never heard of it? Maybe you know the tune by a different name: “God Bless America.” Sure, the 2 songs share only 6…

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STING ROCKS AUSCHWITZ—wait, what?

July 3, 2013
By
sting

Rock out, Auschwitz! Woohoo! Freebird! Hold on there. Rock ‘n’ roll at Auschwitz? Yes, that Auschwitz. The scene of one of the most notorious mass murders in human history. A place where 1 million Jews were killed. One of the most horrifying places on Earth. And now—the home of a great rock ‘n’ roll festival! Roxanne!! It’s…

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The 19th-Century Transgender Surrealist

July 2, 2013
By
claude

A Jewish, transgender, anti-fascist, Surrealist artist, born in France at the end of the 1800s? Keep reading. Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob was a prolific writer, photographer, and actor who didn’t like to be called any of the above. But while she eschewed labels in her personal life, her art revolved around identity. In…

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A 1950s Western With a Jewish Twist

July 1, 2013
By
will-travel

Have Gun – Will Travel was an “adult Western” series that aired in the late 1950s to early 1960s. Set in San Francisco nearly 100 years earlier, the hero, Paladin (played by Richard Boone), was a gentleman gunfighter who enjoyed opera, beautiful women, fine food, and chess. He often quoted Shakespeare and…

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The Jewish Women Who Inspired the Defeat of DOMA

June 28, 2013
By
thea-spyer1

By now you probably know all about Edie Windsor, the octogenarian whose lawsuit led to the defeat of DOMA. What you might not know is the life story of her late wife, Thea Spyer, in whose name Windsor fought for marriage equality. As detailed in United States v. Windsor, an 8-year-old Spyer…

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An Illustrated Kafka For Kids

June 27, 2013
By
my-first-kafka

Children’s books, with their large glossy pages and sparse text, often follow puppies on magical adventures, and always end happily. My First Kafka: Runaways, Rodents & Giant Bugs is no such book. The pages may be visually beautiful thanks to illustrator Rohan Daniel Eason, and the text may be spirited thanks to Jewniverse‘s…

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The Last Jewish Waiter

June 26, 2013
By
last-jewish-waiter

David Manheim, a 38-year-old waiter at New York’s famous Katz’s Deli, hates his job. Really hates his job. And he’s always wanted his own talk show. So on April 20th, he merged his only love with his only hate and launched The Last Jewish Waiter. On TLJW Manheim chronicles his fascination with, and somewhat amusing contempt for, his…

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