The Downton Abbey-Era Jewish Suffragettes

November 4, 2013
By
suffragette

The Jewish World called them “blackguards in bonnets.” In October 1913, 3 women were thrown out of London’s New West End Synagogue during Yom Kippur services after loudly declaring: “May God forgive Herbert Samuel and Sir Rufus Isaacs for denying freedom to women; may God forgive them for consenting to the torture of women.” Members of the Jewish League…

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Win a Free Menurkey! Our Thanksgivukkah Giveaway is ON.

November 1, 2013
By
Plaster-smallest

Jewniverse and The Nosher have teamed up to present the most exciting autumn raffle of 2013: The Ultimate Thanksgivukkah Menurkey Giveaway! Enter to win the grand prize item that’s got the internet in a tizzy: the Menurkey ($58), the inimitable menorah shaped like a turkey. How better to celebrate the never-to-be-repeated…

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An Italian Mob Boss at the Lakewood Yeshiva

November 1, 2013
By
bannanas

As the story goes, during the height of World War II, Rav Aharon Kotler, founder of the Lakewood Yeshiva, learned that several young Polish rabbinical students were detained in Italy. Fearful of these bochers’ fate in a Nazi-occupied country, the rabbi met with an unlikely ally thought to have influence in Italy:…

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The 3 Most Important Jewish Words

October 31, 2013
By
evil-eye

If you’ve never heard the Yiddish/Hebrew phrase, “kein ayin hara,” get ready to meet your new favorite saying.  Literally, these words translate as “no evil eye.” Together, they function as a Jewish “knock on wood.” The origin of the phrase is the superstition that talking about one’s good fortune attracts the attention of…

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Young Yiddish Love Among the Nazis

October 30, 2013
By
the-pin

The second Yiddish language film to be produced in North America in 70 years, and Canada’s first, The Pin is a bleak, moving film about love and remembrance. Set in 1941 Lithuania, The Pin tells the story of a burial guard named Jacob, who is one day faced with the corpse of a woman he’d loved. Through sensuous, dreamlike flashbacks,…

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Polish Catholic Brothers and a Village’s Unsavory Past

October 29, 2013
By
aftermath1

The past might never be dead, but just how deeply can it be buried? That’s the question brothers Franek and Jozek grapple with as they uncover the secrets of their rural Polish village 60 years after World War II, in Władysław Pasikowski‘s controversial film Pokłosie (Aftermath). Franek returns to Poland from Chicago when…

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Jewish Camp Songs Like You Never Heard Them Before

October 24, 2013
By
camp-songs1

Think back to your weeks at Jewish summer camp—site of first kisses, pranks, and, of course, endless singing. Now ask yourself: As you belted out Adon Olam for the 100th time, did you ever wish, just a little, that a jazz band was accompanying you? If the answer is yes, you can revel…

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The Jewish Baseball Star Who Outran a Horse

October 23, 2013
By
lipman-pike

Lipman Pike was not only the first Jewish American sports star and professional baseball player, he was the first pro baseball player altogether. Oh, and there was that time he outran a horse. Born in New York in 1845 to Dutch Jewish parents, Pike began playing baseball soon after his bar mitzvah, and at the age…

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An Undercover Jewess, Uncovered

October 22, 2013
By
hedy-lamar

Jews have long had their place in every aspect in the movie business—and we mean every aspect. In 1933, Ecstasy, the first film to depict sexual intercourse and the female orgasm—not to mention one of the first to even show nudity—scandalized Europe, was banned in the US, and even received a…

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“The Lottery” & The Jews

October 21, 2013
By
lottery

“The Lottery” might be the most famous American short story. Written by Shirley Jackson and published in the New Yorker in 1948, it tells of an unnamed American town where, once a year, residents draw slips of paper from a black box, choosing one person to be murdered by the rest of the…

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Will the Real Menachem Begin Please Stand Up?

October 18, 2013
By
prime-min

Have you ever wished you could be a fly on the wall in the chambers of Israel’s political elite? In The Prime Ministers, a new documentary from Moriah Films that premieres in NYC today, you can be – through the eyes of former diplomat Yehuda Avner, who’s been an insider to some of Israel’s…

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Anna Karenina, Alive and Not That Well in Queens

October 17, 2013
By
anna-k

Thought hundreds of pages about the Russian aristocracy described a world utterly foreign from our own? Irina Reyn’s English-language take on Anna Karenina may be refreshingly slimmer than Tolstoy’s opus but the world it describes is no less fascinating. What Happened to Anna K. (2008) features the insular community of Russian-speaking Jewish émigrés from Bukhara in Central…

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